Monday, May 20, 2019

Breast Cancer Recovery With Cannabis


Brenda L. of Ohio: Breast Cancer

“Eight years ago, Brenda was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was in stage I when they found it. She underwent the lumpectomy and sentinel node biopsy.
A lumpectomy is where just the tumor is removed as well as the normal breast tissue that closely surrounds the tumor. Sentinel node refers to the first lymph node(s) that drains from the breast tumor area (found by injecting a radioactive dye).

“They shoot radiation into your breast and they follow it up to the nodes to make sure that you don’t have cancer in your lymph nodes. And I did not, so all I had to have was radiation…and hormone therapy. Because my cancer was fed by the estrogen.”

Tamoxifen is used to treat certain types of breast cancer that require estrogen to grow. It’s often used following surgery and radiation. (Drugs.com can provide more information on this line of treatment.)

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Sunday, May 19, 2019

The Oil That Restored A Little Girl


Barbara Leigh is a young mother to a little girl who has faced devastating seizures every hour of her life.
It's been ten days since Barbara started her daughter, Nova Leigh, on THC cannabis oil. Ten days without a seizure. When one did come, another dose of the oil and it stopped almost immediately.
Barbara's daughter, Nova Leigh, suffers from a rare birth defect called Shizencehaly. She was also born without a thyroid and only 25% of her brain developed.
We're CPN Institute. We're a national, cannabis educational organization, empowering patients to take a leading role in their healthcare.
Everyone told Barbara that cannabis could not possibly help Nova, but it did. Here is Barbara's account of the ten days following cannabis oil therapy.

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Saturday, May 18, 2019

Bipolar & ADHD Patient Finds Calming Relief


Heath Poland suffers from ADHD (Attention Deficit Disorder) and Bipolar Disorder. Like so many who suffer from mental illness, he spent much of his life mis-diagnosed and improperly and/or over-medicated. Medicating with cannabis calms the symptoms of his disorders and makes the side effects from the pharmaceuticals more tolerable.

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Friday, May 17, 2019

The Simple Epilepsy Medicine


Beth Wilkinson of Kansas: Epilepsy

Beth is originally from Cedar Rapids, Iowa. That’s where she grew up. She got her degree from the University of Northern Iowa. She has a degree in Art Education.

Currently Beth lives in Lawrence, Kansas. It’s turned out to be a really nice place for her and her family to live.

In 1986, Beth was riding horses with a friend. Her horse fell on her and she suffered a TBI, (traumatic brain injury), which landed her in a coma for over a week.

When she came out of the coma, she had to learn everything all over again. Her son was two years old then. “ …so, we basically grew up together.”

She didn’t have any further complications from her injury for years. She finished up her degree and she later moved to Minnesota. But it was there that she began experiencing seizures and black outs.

So she had to start seeing a Neurologist. She was put on Dilantin and stayed on it for years.
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Thursday, May 16, 2019

The EndoCannabinoid System Primer


Cannabinoid receptors, located throughout the body, are part of the endocannabinoid system, which is involved in a variety of physiological processes including appetite, pain-sensation, mood, and memory.

Cannabinoid receptors are of a class of cell membrane receptors in the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. As is typical of G protein-coupled receptors, the cannabinoid receptors contain seven transmembrane spanning domains. Cannabinoid receptors are activated by three major groups of ligands: endocannabinoids, produced by the mammillary body; plant cannabinoids (such as cannabidiol, produced by the cannabis plant); and synthetic cannabinoids (such as HU-210). All of the endocannabinoids and phytocannabinoids (plant based cannabinoids) are lipophilic, such as fat soluble compounds.

There are currently two known subtypes of cannabinoid receptors, termed CB1 and CB2. The CB1 receptor is expressed mainly in the brain (central nervous system or "CNS"), but also in the lungs, liver and kidneys. The CB2 receptor is expressed mainly in the immune system and in hematopoietic cells. Mounting evidence suggests that there are novel cannabinoid receptors that is, non-CB1 and non-CB2, which are expressed in endothelial cells and in the CNS. In 2007, the binding of several cannabinoids to the G protein-coupled receptor GPR55 in the brain was described.

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Ehlers Danlos Syndrome


Heather DeMian of Columbia, Missouri: Ehlers-Danlos Syndromea

Heather is thirty-six years old and confined to a wheelchair. Heather was born with a rare genetic condition called Vascular Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

It’s a defect in her type three collagen that weakens the walls of her blood vessels, organs, and esophagus. “Everything is very weak.”

It makes her joints dislocate very easily. “When you see a new doctor and they see that you have Ehlers-Danlos, they immediately ask ‘what tricks can you do?’ ” A cynical smile comes over Heather’s face.

But condition is no laughing matter. It causes her a lot of pain and gastrointestinal problems, which are further aggravated by the pain meds that are prescribed to her.

Heather takes Zofran, an anti-nausea medication. “Zofran suppresses the gag reflex maybe half the time.” Her Medicaid pays roughly $1200 per month for her to have this drug.

She also takes Marinol, a pharmaceutical synthetic of the cannabinoid THC that is found in cannabis. Heather’s Marinol costs Medicaid roughly $1500 per month.

Together, these prescriptions total $2700 per month or $32400 per year, just to try to suppress Heather’s urge to vomit. Unfortunately, they rarely do. She has to carry a plastic container everywhere she goes for when the urge to vomit comes upon her. Obviously, she doesn’t get to go out very much.

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Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Stopping the Progression of MS


Jack Chavez of Colorado: Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

I consider Jack a friend of mine. Jack’s a pretty remarkable guy. Jack has Progressive Multiple Sclerosis. I’ve interviewed a number of people with MS, but none quite as remarkable as Jack.

The first time I met Jack was in 2006 while traveling across the country with Journey for Justice 7. My good friend and Denver Caregiver Diana McKindley agreed to introduce me to some of her patients. Jack was number one on the list.

At the time of my interview, Jack was still having difficulty talking. So for the interview, Diana agreed to read a short speech to me that Jack had prepared.

We take for granted the choreography of muscles required to sustain speech. Jack has to concentrate and apply great effort to do what comes naturally for us, even when all he is trying to do is say a few words.

In 1994, Jack was diagnosed with Chronic MS. This progressive form of Multiple Sclerosis is similar to what claimed the life of comedian Richard Pryor.
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